RESOURCES​

EMPLOYMENT LAW WEBSITES

National Employment Lawyers Association (NELA)
This site provides resources to lawyers who practice employment law.

Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC)
This is the federal agency in charge of investigating employment discrimination claims. The EEOC website offers a historical perspective of equal employment in the United States, in addition to current laws and resources.

Pennsylvania Human Relations Commission (PHRC)
This is the state agency in charge of investigating employment discrimination claims. The PHRC website provides answers to questions about the Commission, procedures and the PHRC’s role within Pennsylvania which includes investigating complaints of discrimination and monitoring bias-related crimes and tension within communities.

Pennsylvania Unemployment Compensation
This site provides a variety of resources related to Pennsylvania unemployment law.

Pennsylvania Workers' Compensation
This site provides a variety of publications, forms and FAQ’s related to workers compensation claims in Pennsylvania.

New Jersey Division on Civil Rights
This site provides information about discrimination law in the State of New Jersey. 

ENTERTAINMENT LAW WEBSITES

Wikipedia
This website offers a concise definition of entertainment law and related fields.

Philadelphia Volunteer Lawyers for the Arts
This is a website dedicated to the Philadelphia Volunteer Lawyers for the Arts, a nonprofit legal services organization which provides pro-bono legal assistance, educational programs and business counseling to artists and cultural organizations. 

The National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences
This is the website for the National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences (GRAMMYs) and highlights the history of the music recording industry in the United States.  

Philadelphia Chapter of the Academy of Recording Arts 

HOW TO COPYRIGHT A MUSICAL WORK

Go to the U.S. Copyright Office Website at: http://www.copyright.gov/
The copyright website has numerous links with various resources to answer questions about copyright registration. 
For a general explanation of copyright you can go to: http://www.copyright.gov/circs/circ1.html#wci
Determine whether you are registering a “sound recording” or a “musical composition.” 
The copyright website gives a good explanation of this at: http://www.copyright.gov/register/pa-sr.html
Once you have determined what type of work you are registering follow these instructions:
If you are registering a musical composition go to: http://www.copyright.gov/register/performing.html and follow the steps that the U.S. Copyright Office has laid out on this website.
This includes filling out the appropriate forms and mailing them with payment to the copyright office in Washington D.C.
If you are registering a sound recording go to: http://www.copyright.gov/register/sound.html and follow the steps that the U.S. Copyright Office has laid out on this website
This includes filling out the appropriate forms and mailing them with payment to the copyright office in Washington D.C.
Why should you register your copyright with the U.S Copyright Office?
You want to have the facts of your copyright on the public record and have a certificate of registration.
If you register your copyright with the U.S. Copyright Office you are eligible for statutory fees and attorney’s fees in a successful copyright infringement claim. 
If you register your copyright within five (5) years of publishing the work it is considered prima facie evidence of copyright in a court of law.